Tuesday, June 29

Poster Sessions at ISTE -2010



Posters are informal, booth-like interactions that involve teachers sharing a specific learning experience that they have facilitated.
In viewing these through a literacy lens the following ideas caught my eye. I was impressed with the ease in which these ideas had been implemented and the positive impact that they were having on student outcomes.

Photos, Videos, and Animation to Boost Language, Writing, and Comprehension
Adina Sullivan, San Marcos Unified School District
This poster session relates well to my previous post. It focused on how visuals help students increase valuable vocabulary, especially for reluctant or struggling readers and English language learners. It is well worth taking 5minutes to flick through these slides for key points from the research and ideas and resources to support the progression from oral to written language
http://adinaeducation.wikispaces.com/Conference+Presentations


I Can See Me Read – Using webcams for reading fluency

Timothy Frey, Kansas State University with Abby Houlton
This intervention includes having the student record as they read aloud in front of a webcam. The student then uses a self-correction procedure as they play back the video clip. The teacher then conferences with the student and the process is repeated. In pilot implementations, students have benefited significantly from this approach.
Click here to see the 1page research report.

Tiny Techies: Web 2.0 in the Early Elementary Classroom
Melodie Brewer, Dysart Unified School District with Cristy Diaz
Through the use of artifacts including student work and student voice this poster demonstrated the use of several different web 2.0 resources. Each resource focused on the development of one of the following three areas: communication, collaboration, and creativity.
See this fantastic resource for an overview, teacher support material and student examples.
http://www.melodiebrewer.com/ISTE%202010.html

Thanks to all those amazing teachers who shared how they are using technology to make a difference to student outcomes.

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